Abandoned. Omitted. Left out. Forgotten.

These aren’t pleasant words, are they? They may evoke feelings we don’t care to linger in too long. For those of us who’ve experienced them (who hasn’t??), we know all too well the hurt and pain the actions of these words can cause.

I’ve had a few experiences of them lately…

Months ago I was invited to participate in an upcoming event, but when the event graphic was revealed recently, my name and photo were absent.

A friend gave a gift to everyone at our Christmas gathering. Everyone… but yours truly.

A group I’m a part of celebrates our birthdays, however this year mine was never celebrated, nor mentioned.

Recently a group of close friends went out for dinner. I found out about it days later.

3 Truths to remember when you feel forgotten

Deep wounds can begin to form when we feel forgotten. We begin to ask questions such as, “What’s wrong with me?” and “Why was I not included?” Feelings of less-than begin to shape our self-worth.

Feeling forgotten is a hurtful and awful feeling.

It sure is. The pain is real and so is the hurt. In not trying to minimize the pain, however, God showed me something after my last forgotten incident. He showed me a knew way to deal with it.

God reminded me feeling forgotten is a feeling. It’s an emotion. And, as with all feelings, I didn’t have to follow it. I didn’t have to give into that emotion. (Stay with me here.) Goodness, if I gave into every emotion within me on any given day, I’d be a complete mess. If I followed every feeling that presented itself, I’d be job-less, homeless, spouse-less, mother-less, friend-less.

You don’t follow every feeling either. Think about that for a moment. What would happen on the mornings you just didn’t feel like getting out of bed, or going to work, or taking the kids to school? I’d never leave my house if that was the case!

We don’t follow every single feeling we feel, so why must we follow the one of feeling forgotten? Friend, we don’t.

1. Feeling forgotten is a feeling we don’t have to give into.

Next, take a look at the definition of forgotten:

forgotten :: to omit or neglect unintentionally

That puts a new light on it, doesn’t it? Being forgotten is unintentional. It’s an oversight, and realizing this truth softens the blow and helps us forgive. (I wonder how many times I’ve unintentionally left someone out??)

2. Being left out is most often unintentional.

Lastly, take a look at this truth:

Is it possible for a mother, however disappointed, however hurt, to forget her nursing child? Can she feel nothing for the baby she carried and birthed? Even if she could, I, God, will never forget you. Look here. I have made you a part of Me, written you on the palms of My hands. Isaiah 49:15-16 (VOICE)

Even though God is referring to the Israelites in this passage, we can claim this verse for us as well.

3. God will never forget us.

That’s the best news all day!

This insight, as a result, has helped me in letting go the hurt, forgiving others, and resting in my God-given worth.

So, the next time we find ourselves feeling forgotten and left out, may we remember these three truths: 1) we don’t have to give into those feelings; 2) the action was likely unintentional; 3) our very names are on God’s hands!

Blessings,
Julie

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This